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Confetti Park

Confetti Park is a playground of magical music and stories spun in Louisiana. Showcasing songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful musical medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show! Created by Katy Hobgood Ray of New Orleans.
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Now displaying: November, 2015
Nov 24, 2015

Julieann Banks is an Americana artists from Shreveport, Louisiana. A wonderful singer-songwriter with a big soulful voice, Julieann has been playing music most of her life, and has performed extensively in the Austin, Texas area as well as Louisiana.

Julieann had a childhood rich with musical and cultural experiences. Her parents were supportive of the arts and frequently took her along to symphonies, operas, and classical piano recitals. The famous Shreveport-born pianist Van Cliburn and opera star Beverly Sills were even guests at their home. But it was a live musical performance of Jesus Christ Superstar (Andrew Lloyd Weber and Tim Rice) that truly captivated Julieann’s soul:

“The hair on my arms and my neck was just standing on end, and it was just like the whole room was full of electricity. And I knew that nothing was going to stop me or get in my way, that that was exactly what I would be doing…. I knew that I wasn’t ever going to be the same.”

Learn more about Julieann’s music at http://julieannbanks.com/

Thank you, Julieann, for sharing this powerful music memory from your childhood with Confetti Park!

 
Nov 20, 2015

What would you do if your mother promised to marry you to the first person who climbed up a pole to catch a pumpkin?

That’s exactly how it happened in this old Louisiana folk tale, called “The Devil’s Marriage.”

Things go from bad to worse for a young girl who finds herself married to the devil… Fortunately, she gets sympathy from his mother and manages to escape through a series of homespun trials!

“The Devil’s Marriage” is one of the Louisiana folk tales collected by Alcee Fortier, a famous researcher and professor at Tulane University in the late 1800s. Fortier was renown for his publications on the French literature of Louisiana and France and his studies on Louisiana Creoles, Acadians and Isleños.

For more of his collection of folk tales, see Louisiana Folk Tales: In French Dialect and English Translation, 1894.

Thank you to Magpie Baccinelli for narrating this Louisiana folk tale for Confetti Park!

Nov 14, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana. This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:

We’re Going to Confetti Park – Confetti Park Players
Miss Mary Mack – Confetti Park Players
Shrimp & Gumbo – Dave Bartholomew
Humpty Dumpty – Louis Ray
Following My Mom Around – Imagination Movers
Oscar de la Oyster – Don Hoffman and the Louisiana Pollywogs
Hot Tamale Baby – Buckwheat Zydeco
King Cake Babies – Alan Dyson
Brahms’ Lullaby – Steve Riley, Yvette Landry & Richard Comeaux
Get Along Home – Kandice Chester
Narration – Papillon
Let’s Go! – Papillon
Iko Iko –  Confetti Park Players

For more information about these artists, and kids music in Louisiana, visit http://confettipark.com

Nov 4, 2015

In this episode of Confetti Park, we hear a formative childhood music memory from Duane Pitre, American composer, sound artist, and guitarist.

Duane tends to focus on one thing at a time and learns it inside and out—whether that thing is skateboarding, composing experimental music, or playing guitar. (The former pro skateboarder says he has an “obsessive personality” in this 2012 ESPN article about his journey through the worlds of skateboarding and music.)

Currently, Duane is focusing on studying classical guitar.

Duane, who was born and raised in New Orleans, says his parents regularly attended rock and heavy metal concerts, and ensured that he was immersed in a healthy soundscape of the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and the Allman Brothers. (In fact, Duane was named for Duane Allman.)

In Duane’s music memory, he reveals how a single note can emotionally affect a listener. Duane was only 5 or 6 when he put on a vinyl record of the self-titled Black Sabbath album. The mood was set by the thunderstorm, the church bells, and then the music came in…. with the tritone.

Little Duane was terrified, and immediately turned off the album, but the seeds of wonder were planted.

“It was an experience I will never forget,” says Duane. “It was the earliest musical experience of me hearing something and it really affecting me in some way…. It made me aware of the power of music.”

Thank you, Duane, for sharing this fascinating memory with Confetti Park!

Nov 1, 2015

Today’s featured story is the childhood memoir of a Louisiana beekeeper. This is Dan Hobgood, of Shreveport. He owns the company Bee-Goods, which is headquartered in the north part of Sportsman’s Paradise (that’s one of Louisiana’s nicknames). The bees are raised in the gently rolling hills of Ida, Louisiana on the family homestead nestled near a pine forest. The bees feed on wildflowers, wild berries, clover, goldenrod, and buckwheat, as well as garden fruits and vegetables such as squash, melons, persimmons, and figs.

Dan is originally from south Louisiana, and he regularly travels to regional farmers markets to sell honey and other bee products (currently he is fermenting honey vinegar), including the Crescent City Farmers Markets in New Orleans. Whenever he comes to NOLA, he visits his daughter in Algiers Point: Katy Hobgood Ray—the host of Confetti Park!!!

Dan came to beekeeping in recent years, but in this childhood memoir about growing up in Bogalusa, he recalls his first misadventure in beekeeping. Perhaps bees have always been his destiny!

Learn more about the importance of honeybees, and the importance of restricting pesticides in farming, here.

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