Info

Confetti Park

Confetti Park is a playground of magical music and stories spun in Louisiana. Showcasing songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful musical medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show! Created by Katy Hobgood Ray of New Orleans.
RSS Feed
2017
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2015
Dec 28, 2015

Hazel Schlueter is well known for her old time country music and bluegrass show on WWOZ (90.7 FM in New Orleans) and for her musical performances as the band leader of Hazel & the Delta Ramblers.

In this episode of Confetti Park, Hazel shares a music memory from her early childhood. When she was just three years old, she knew wanted to play music, and asker her parents for a real piano. Much to her chagrin, the piano she received was a TOY!

“My parents bought me a toy piano,” she recalls. “I was only three years old, but I looked at the toy piano and the black notes were painted on to the white notes. I knew this was not a real piano, and I was very sad.”

But little Hazel persevered, and kept on asking for a piano. About a year and a half later, her parents finally gave in.

“So kids, don’t be fooled!” advises Hazel. “Just keep asking, keep after them, and maybe your parents will come around.”

 
Dec 24, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana. This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians.

 

 

 

Songs featured in this episode, in order:

For more information about these artists, and kids music in Louisiana, visit http://confettipark.com


The Confetti Park hosted by Katy Hobgood Ray, features music and stories spun in Louisiana. It showcases songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and songs created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful music medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show!

Subscribe on iTunes

The radio program version launched on April 4, 2015 in New Orleans on WHIV FM and is supported by the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation, OffBeat magazine and Music Rising at Tulane University.

Current broadcast schedule:

Community radio stations, interested in carrying Confetti Park? Contact Katy Ray.

Dec 15, 2015

In this edition of Confetti Park, Katy Ray sits down with Judy Caplan Ginsburgh of Alexandria, La. to talk about children’s music. Judy has been creating music for children since 1981! Among the topics they discuss: what kinds of songs do little kids love? How does Judy share her Jewish heritage through song?

Judy specializes in music for young children and in Jewish music. In fact, Judy is a rabbi, a Jewish religious leader.  While she has a degree in vocal performance (from Indiana University), she never intended to become a children’s musician. She was singing songs with the children at her office’s preschool regularly (on her lunch breaks), when parents and teachers started asking her to record some of the songs. Thus, her first album was born: Sing Along with Judy. That was in 1981—the rest is history!

Judy writes original music but also plays traditional songs.

“I’m a huge believer in not forgetting these old nursery rhymes and folk tunes that have been around for so long. They’ve been around for generations because they are good,” says Judy. “We ought to teach new things and write new things, but we shouldn’t forget these old tried and true songs, either.”

What makes a children’s song good?

“Number one, they’re simple. They’re short. The tunes are very catchy, they’re easy to catch on to,” advises Judy. “Many of the tunes a lot of us use in early childhood music are also call and response… and also things called zipper songs, where the tune and the words remain the same except for one word. So those kinds of songs work very well for young children because they’re repetitive, they’re repeating after you, they’re reinforcing one thing at a time so they actually can be used for learning.”

Judy also uses a lot of props, audience participation, and movement when working with children in music. “You cannot sing to children. You sing with children,” she emphasizes.

In addition to her numerous general music CDs for young kids (preschool age), Judy has recorded nine albums of Jewish music. These CDs are really good for families, says Judy.

“There are so many interfaith families now, and that’s really why this started,” she explains.”Mainly the mothers were not Jewish, but they were the ones raising the children. So  they needed to learn the traditional songs that their kids were singing at Sunday School and at Jewish camp. To help teach non-Jews about our Jewish heritage…This is music that we all grew up with, they they may not have.”

While Judy’s earlier Jewish music CDs feature mostly traditional songs, her later CDs feature originals.

“I used to teach in a Jewish day school, and a lot of times we’re trying to teach a concept, an ethical philosophy, and I always taught with music,” explains Judy. “But there wouldn’t be a song, for instance, about tzedakah, which means charity, or helping people. And, so I wrote a song about tzedakah.”

Just loves performing and is also available for teacher training, to teach teachers how to use music in the classroom. You can reach her through her website at http://www.judymusic.com/

Songs featured in this episode: “Aiken Drum,” “Sing Along Song,” and “Tzedakah.”

Dec 13, 2015

It's Christmas Storytime on Confetti Park!

You've heard about the friendly beasts in the manger, who all gave their own special gift to the baby Jesus, who was born in a stable so rude.

There was the donkey, who gave mother Mary a ride, and the cow, who gave up her manger and hay for the newborn child. The sheep gave his soft wool to keep the baby warm. And the doves cooed the baby to sleep with their sweet song.... did a kitty also offer some comfort to the baby?

In this retelling of the Christmas story, Mary Jean Chester of Bayou Gauche, Louisiana, imagines what role a barn cat might have had in the wee hours of the morning, when baby Jesus needed soothing.

Mary Jean is a retired teacher and has spent years telling stories to children in south Louisiana. Thank you, Mary Jean, for sharing your gift with Confetti Park!

Dec 9, 2015

New Orleans musician Roger Lewis shares a childhood music memory with Confetti Park about his first love, the saxophone.

Roger Lewis has had a wonderful career in music that keeps him traveling around the world to this day. The baritone saxophonist is a founding member of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, which began in 1977! He is also a member of the Treme Brass Band, the Delfeayo Marsalis Uptown Jazz Orchestra, Walter “Wolfman” Washington’s band, and several other bands around town.

Roger, who is still going strong at over 70 years of age, recalls how it all began:

When I was a little guy, maybe around 8 years old, I was fascinated with the shape of the saxophone. I used to take newspapers and form them in the shape of a cone, and shape them into the shape of a saxophone….and I would be in the backyard [pretending to play musical notes].…. pretty much that was my toy as a kid! I got my first saxophone when I was 10 years old.

He also talks a bit about his mechanical inclinations as a kid.

Thank you, Roger, for sharing this wonderful memory with Confetti Park.

Dec 2, 2015

In this episode of Confetti Park we hear The Jungle Grapevine by author Alex Beard!

Alex is a fine artist who paints and draws beautiful animals and other inspiring sights from the natural world. He owns an art studio and gallery at 608 Julia Street where he displays his work, and which serves as a base for The Watering Hole Foundation, a nonprofit focusing on conservation. Alex wants to preserve the wilderness, natural beauty, and wildlife of our planet. He hopes that when children read his books, they will learn about the importance of conservation, even as they are entertained by the whimsical animal adventures.

The Jungle Grapevine is his first children's book (2009). It’s a comedic game of telephone between animals in an African savannah:

When Bird mixes up something Turtle says, he accidentally starts a rumor about the watering hole drying up. One misunderstanding leads to another, with animals making their own hilarious assumptions.


 
No one is hearing anything right, and soon the animals are in an uproar from one end of the jungle to the other. Elephant is trumpeting, Croc is snapping, and the Flamingos are fleeing! 


There are two more books in the Watering Hole trilogyMonkey See, Monkey Draw, and Crocodile’s Tears. Learn more about Alex and his mission in an upcoming interview with Confetti Park and at his website, http://alexbeardstudio.com/

Thank you Alex, for narrating The Jungle Grapevine for us!

Nov 24, 2015

Julieann Banks is an Americana artists from Shreveport, Louisiana. A wonderful singer-songwriter with a big soulful voice, Julieann has been playing music most of her life, and has performed extensively in the Austin, Texas area as well as Louisiana.

Julieann had a childhood rich with musical and cultural experiences. Her parents were supportive of the arts and frequently took her along to symphonies, operas, and classical piano recitals. The famous Shreveport-born pianist Van Cliburn and opera star Beverly Sills were even guests at their home. But it was a live musical performance of Jesus Christ Superstar (Andrew Lloyd Weber and Tim Rice) that truly captivated Julieann’s soul:

“The hair on my arms and my neck was just standing on end, and it was just like the whole room was full of electricity. And I knew that nothing was going to stop me or get in my way, that that was exactly what I would be doing…. I knew that I wasn’t ever going to be the same.”

Learn more about Julieann’s music at http://julieannbanks.com/

Thank you, Julieann, for sharing this powerful music memory from your childhood with Confetti Park!

 
Nov 20, 2015

What would you do if your mother promised to marry you to the first person who climbed up a pole to catch a pumpkin?

That’s exactly how it happened in this old Louisiana folk tale, called “The Devil’s Marriage.”

Things go from bad to worse for a young girl who finds herself married to the devil… Fortunately, she gets sympathy from his mother and manages to escape through a series of homespun trials!

“The Devil’s Marriage” is one of the Louisiana folk tales collected by Alcee Fortier, a famous researcher and professor at Tulane University in the late 1800s. Fortier was renown for his publications on the French literature of Louisiana and France and his studies on Louisiana Creoles, Acadians and Isleños.

For more of his collection of folk tales, see Louisiana Folk Tales: In French Dialect and English Translation, 1894.

Thank you to Magpie Baccinelli for narrating this Louisiana folk tale for Confetti Park!

Nov 14, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana. This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:

We’re Going to Confetti Park – Confetti Park Players
Miss Mary Mack – Confetti Park Players
Shrimp & Gumbo – Dave Bartholomew
Humpty Dumpty – Louis Ray
Following My Mom Around – Imagination Movers
Oscar de la Oyster – Don Hoffman and the Louisiana Pollywogs
Hot Tamale Baby – Buckwheat Zydeco
King Cake Babies – Alan Dyson
Brahms’ Lullaby – Steve Riley, Yvette Landry & Richard Comeaux
Get Along Home – Kandice Chester
Narration – Papillon
Let’s Go! – Papillon
Iko Iko –  Confetti Park Players

For more information about these artists, and kids music in Louisiana, visit http://confettipark.com

Nov 4, 2015

In this episode of Confetti Park, we hear a formative childhood music memory from Duane Pitre, American composer, sound artist, and guitarist.

Duane tends to focus on one thing at a time and learns it inside and out—whether that thing is skateboarding, composing experimental music, or playing guitar. (The former pro skateboarder says he has an “obsessive personality” in this 2012 ESPN article about his journey through the worlds of skateboarding and music.)

Currently, Duane is focusing on studying classical guitar.

Duane, who was born and raised in New Orleans, says his parents regularly attended rock and heavy metal concerts, and ensured that he was immersed in a healthy soundscape of the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and the Allman Brothers. (In fact, Duane was named for Duane Allman.)

In Duane’s music memory, he reveals how a single note can emotionally affect a listener. Duane was only 5 or 6 when he put on a vinyl record of the self-titled Black Sabbath album. The mood was set by the thunderstorm, the church bells, and then the music came in…. with the tritone.

Little Duane was terrified, and immediately turned off the album, but the seeds of wonder were planted.

“It was an experience I will never forget,” says Duane. “It was the earliest musical experience of me hearing something and it really affecting me in some way…. It made me aware of the power of music.”

Thank you, Duane, for sharing this fascinating memory with Confetti Park!

Nov 1, 2015

Today’s featured story is the childhood memoir of a Louisiana beekeeper. This is Dan Hobgood, of Shreveport. He owns the company Bee-Goods, which is headquartered in the north part of Sportsman’s Paradise (that’s one of Louisiana’s nicknames). The bees are raised in the gently rolling hills of Ida, Louisiana on the family homestead nestled near a pine forest. The bees feed on wildflowers, wild berries, clover, goldenrod, and buckwheat, as well as garden fruits and vegetables such as squash, melons, persimmons, and figs.

Dan is originally from south Louisiana, and he regularly travels to regional farmers markets to sell honey and other bee products (currently he is fermenting honey vinegar), including the Crescent City Farmers Markets in New Orleans. Whenever he comes to NOLA, he visits his daughter in Algiers Point: Katy Hobgood Ray—the host of Confetti Park!!!

Dan came to beekeeping in recent years, but in this childhood memoir about growing up in Bogalusa, he recalls his first misadventure in beekeeping. Perhaps bees have always been his destiny!

Learn more about the importance of honeybees, and the importance of restricting pesticides in farming, here.

Oct 27, 2015

In this episode of Confetti Park, we hear from Anthony Dopsie, accordion player with Rockin' Dopsie, Jr. & The Zydeco Twisters.

Anthony explains his role in the band ("I put the choo choo to the boogaloo!") and he shares a childhood memory about growing up in a musical family. The Dopsies are Louisiana royalty—Anthony's father was Rockin' Dopsie, Sr., famed zydeco accordionist. (Check out this interview with Anthony's brother, Rockin' Dopsie, Jr.)

Says Anthony: "What got me into music was I started knowing that my dad was famous. He was just my Daddy, you know.... But when I got older and started seeing my dad on TV, and all the kids would want to come by, I said, 'Well, that's my dad, and I want to be like him one day!'"

Anthony also offers some good advice to kids about how to carve out your own niche in this world. Take a look around, and think about who you are, where you come from.....what are the things you really love, that maybe you take for granted? Maybe the answer is right in front of you.

"I really love my music. I really love my culture," says Anthony. "I advise all the kids today to never forget where you come from. It starts off as a kid.... we all started from a flower. You keep watering that flower, one day that flower is gonna grow."

 

What colorful, beautiful flowers we grow in Louisiana!

Oct 22, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana.

This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:

_____________________________


The Confetti Park hosted by Katy Hobgood Ray, features music and stories spun in Louisiana. It showcases songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and songs created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful music medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show!

Subscribe on iTunes

The radio program version launched on April 4, 2015 in New Orleans on WHIV FM and is supported by the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation and Music Rising at Tulane University.

Current broadcast schedule:

Community radio stations, interested in carrying Confetti Park? Contact Katy Ray.

 

 

Oct 15, 2015

Every year when the leaves start to fall, I visit my Grandpa and we have a ball.

With snoballs, streetcars, beignets, and the Dome, New Orleans is a place he is proud to call home.

So begins this adorable love letter to New Orleans, as told through the eyes of a child who is visiting her grandfather.

Many of the sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and wonderful attractions of the city are featured in this aural tour of New Orleans. From the Audubon Zoo to City Park, from the Mississippi River to the Lake Pontchartrain, Patricia Reece of Slidell, Louisiana gathers up the aspects of New Orleans that she has learned to cherish through a loving, nurturing relationship (and friendship) with her grandpa. 

For Patricia and her grandfather, nothing can beat Gumbo, Fried Cheese, the Saints and Drew Brees.

Oct 10, 2015

New Orleans jazz vocalist Jayna Morgan shares a music memory from her childhood in this episode of Confetti Park.

Jayna, who sings with the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band and the Swing Setters (among others), recalls the happiness of sharing music with her mother. When Jayna was a child, they would go fishing together, and whenever they would sit on the wharf, her mother would sing to her.

Sharing songs as a family can build a lifetime love of music, as we have seen with Jayna. She is a very active entertainer on the South Louisiana scene. In addition to performing with several bands,  she is also a booking agent at 11th Commandment Records, owner of Fleur Decuers, and her in her spare time, a swing dancer and Lindy hopper.

Check out this interview with Jayna and the Swing Setters, a group that plays kids music jazz-style.

Oct 1, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana.

This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:


The Confetti Park hosted by Katy Hobgood Ray, features music and stories spun in Louisiana. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful music medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show! We also broadcast weekly on WHIV 102.3 FM in New Orleans and KSLU 90.9 FM in Hammond.

Sep 25, 2015

In this episode of Confetti Park, we hear a childhood music memory from David Rosser, a talented guitarist and multi instrumentalist who lives in New Orleans. Dave shares about how his big brother was one of his greatest musical influences—and how they bonded and he learned from listening to records—especially the Beatles!

Dave has toured the world several times with different musical groups. He also produces, recorded, and mixes at his studio, Chateau Daveaux. Among those who he has performed and/or recorded with are the Afghan Whigs, the Twilight Singers, Mark Broussard, Ani Di Franco, Terry McDermott, Mark Lanegan Band, and the Gutter Twins. Most recently, Dave has been performing around New Orleans with Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue.

Lucky for us, Dave Rosser is a featured guitarist on the upcoming Confetti Park Players CD, featuring a children’s choir based in Algiers. Check out his masterful work behind Mr. Okra and the kids on “Have You Seen the Okra Man?”

Sep 23, 2015

What do you do with a cow that does not moo?

Westwego’s own Mel Lecompte, Jr. explores this conundrum in his colorful children’s tale, The Ice Cream Cow. Here he narrates for Confetti Park! Available for purchase on Amazon

Living on a farm with her friends the Chocolate Chip Chicken and the Soda Pop Duck, the Ice Cream Cow has a problem. While there are many things she can do — such as hop like a kangaroo — the poor cow does not moo. Kids will love the rhythmic tale of the cherry-topped, polka-dotted bovine and the quest for her true voice. Savvy parents who read this story to their little ones will enjoy scanning the illustrations for inside references meant to keep big people’s eyes in the book and not on their watches.

Mel is an elementary school teacher, an award-winning journalist and cartoonist, a musician and an entertainer (check out his band Mel and the Moodoggies), and a dad who writes and illustrates his own books, including T-Boy and the Terrible Turtle.

 

Sep 19, 2015

In this music memory for Confetti Park, jazz researcher and music promoter Tom Stagg shares how he became fascinated with New Orleans music in 1949, as a youngster growing up in England. Blame it on Louis Armstrong! He moved to New Orleans in the 1960s.

Tom Stagg is one of the owners of the New Orleans music label 504 Records, which he established in 1979. (Before that, his label was called NOLA Records.) The label specializes in traditional jazz music of New Orleans. For years, Tom was instrumental in organizing tours for New Orleans musicians such as Kid Thomas, John Handy, Emanuel Sayles, Andrew Morgan, Louis Nelson and Alton Purnell, and later, Fats Domino and Dr. John.

Tom himself was a musician for many years (bass, piano) as well as a professional wrestler! He is also from a musical family—his mother was a vocal soloist and his father was a dance band drummer.

Thank you, Tom!

Sep 14, 2015

From the swamps of the Atchafalaya Basin comes The Ghost Tree, a tale so terrifying that children will never forget its warning, and will never look at oak trees the same.

The story of three brothers who defy their parents on All Hallow’s Eve was written by musician Yvette Landry of Breaux Bridge. We are so delighted that Yvette narrated her spooky story for Confetti Park! It is a winner of the 2015 Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice Award.

The story begins in her ancestral home, the small, somewhat isolated community of Isle Labbé, and ends in the swamps of the Atchafalaya Basin. Her grandfather tells her of an ancient Native American legend: A cursed tree that comes to life every Halloween. Unlucky travelers who stumble across the tree on that fateful night are never seen again. He would know after all, he’s the only one ever to survive an encounter with … The Ghost Tree.


From her website: Yvette Landry grew up in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, not far from the levees of the Atchafalaya Basin, North America’s largest swampland. It was in and around that swamp where she learned to hunt, fish, ride horses, dance, understand French, and tell stories.

After earning a master’s degree in education and developing a successful teaching career, she began telling stories through song. The songs were a hit, and so was Yvette. Playing a variety of instruments in several Cajun bands, Yvette also fronts her own band.

Her debut award-winning album titled “Should Have Known” was released in 2010. Over the past several years, Yvette has traveled the world and played countless cultural festivals from the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival to the GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance in New York. She toured Russia and served as a Cultural Ambassador on behalf of the Library of Congress to perform at the Festival of Traditional American Music.

Learn more about Yvette Landry’s music and stories and her marvelous career on her website, http://yvettelandry.com/.

Sep 11, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana.

This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:


 

The Confetti Park hosted by Katy Hobgood Ray, features music and stories spun in Louisiana. It showcases songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and songs created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful music medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show! We also broadcast weekly on WHIV 102.3 FM in New Orleans and KSLU 90.9 FM in Hammond.

Sep 5, 2015

In this edition of Confetti Park, we have a very special reading by Louisiana children’s author Johnette Downing. This is a narration of her new book, The Fifolet.

The fifolet (or feufollet) is a very spooky Louisiana legend that appears frequently in Cajun and Houmas Indian folklore. The say that the fifolet are swamp spirits making lights deep in the swamps……  Great big eerie balls of light, that seem to float above the water, and beckon the watcher to follow! Interestingly, this kind of legend appears not just Louisiana culture, but around the world. (Ever heard of the will o’ the wisps in Europe or ghost lights in Japan?)

Different explanations blame supernatural spirits, or mischievous elves and fairies, or even the lost souls  of pirates guarding lost treasures in the swamp. And some people say it’s nothing but phosphorescent swamp gas making the blue fire.

In her book, which was illustrated by Jennifer Lindsley, Johnette Downing tells about the fifolet through the experience of fisherman Jean-Paul Pierre, who has his heart set on finding the fifolet’s buried treasure.

“Through cypress trees and beards of moss, there is a fire spirit that you never want to cross. It will tease you and coax you and draw you near, but all the Cajuns know that you better beware.”

Worth noting is that the music to this story was also written and performed by Johnette. The music is actually from a song about another swamp creature known in Louisiana: the loup group, featured on her CD From the Gumbo Pot.

Aug 31, 2015

Annie Hardy Calais was born in 1927 in rural Southwest Louisiana. She recently shared many true stories of her childhood growing up in Cajun Country with Confetti Park. Here is a great music memory:

"When I was 8 or 9 years old, I loved music....my niece had a radio at her home, but we had no electricity, so I had no music in my home, except for mom, who had a beautiful voice, and we'd sing at night. 

But still, I wanted some radio music.... I heard music coming from a potato shed where men worked, and they had a radio on.... and I remember studying in science that water helped sound. So we had an old hand pump nearby, and an old washtub...."

What a clever, creative student!

Aug 29, 2015

Confetti Park is a community radio program and podcast out of New Orleans. We feature local storytellers and songs that kids love, songs created for kids, or created by kids, right here in Louisiana.

 This medley of kids music shows the diversity of Louisiana musicians. Songs featured in this episode, in order:

Wishing To Go Crawfishin' - Terrance Simien
Old Dan Tucker - Jeremy Lyons
Love Bug - Johnette Downing
Wobble Cha - Los Po-Boy-Citos
The Shark and the Fish - Louis Ray
Pretty Purple Possums - Angela Mannino and the Louisiana Pollywogs
Bridge Street Lullaby / Lac Martin - David Greely, Joel Savoy & Sam Broussard


The Confetti Park hosted by Katy Hobgood Ray, features music and stories spun in Louisiana. It showcases songs that kids love, songs created for kids, and songs created by kids. Sparkling interviews, in-studio performances, delightful music medleys, jokes, local author storytime, and a little surprise lagniappe make for an entertaining show! We also broadcast weekly on WHIV 102.3 FM in New Orleans and KSLU 90.9 FM in Hammond.

Aug 18, 2015

Hey Saints fans! Football season is here! And we have a very special book to celebrate.

In this episode of Confetti Park, Alexander Brian McConduit narrates his original story,The Little WHO DAT Who Didn't, which is all about one little boy’s love/hate relationship with his favorite team.

The book takes you through the Saints’ amazing Superbowl season and tries to put into words what THAT season was like through the eyes of Buddy.

All of the characters are named after Saints players & figures, pre & post. Follow Buddy, his family, friends & the city of New Orleans as we relive one of the most memorable times the citizens of New Orleans have ever seen.

The story is scored with accompaniment by the Confetti Park Players, a kids chorus based in Algiers.

Thank you Alex for reading The Little WHO DAT Who Didn't for Confetti Park! What an emotional rollercoaster that season was—and so is this book!

You can buy the book at Amazon.com. Learn more about Alex and his other children’s books at http://bigbootbooks.com/about/.

And check out Alex reading Thorn in My Horn and Snoballs for All for Confetti Park.

1 2 3 4 Next »